language, literature, philosophy

Critical Postmodern Readings, Part 4: Derrida

This series hasn't been as rough as I've expected this far. The first few parts showed some of the classic postmodernists to be clearer and more prescient than many give them credit for. This changes all that. Derrida is rough going. I chose his most famous work, Differance, for today. I couldn't remember if I had… Continue reading Critical Postmodern Readings, Part 4: Derrida

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language, literature, philosophy

Critical Postmodern Readings, Part 3: Baudrillard

Jean Baudrillard is one of those postmodernist philosophers that people can name but probably don't know much about. He's most famous for his work Simulacra and Simulation, in which he argues we've replaced everything real in our society by symbols (more on this later). If you're thinking of the movie The Matrix, then you've understood. That movie gets… Continue reading Critical Postmodern Readings, Part 3: Baudrillard

ethics, language, literature, philosophy

Critical Postmodern Readings, Part 2: Finishing Lyotard

Last time we looked at the introduction to Lyotard's The Postmodern Condition: A Report on Knowledge. That introduction already contained much of what gets fleshed out in the rest of the short book, so I'm going to mostly summarize stuff until we hit anything that requires serious critical thought. The first chapter goes into how computers… Continue reading Critical Postmodern Readings, Part 2: Finishing Lyotard

art, language, literature, philosophy

Critical Postmodern Readings, Part 1: Lyotard

I'm over nine years into this blog, so I think most readers know my opinions and worldview on many issues in philosophy. I roughly subscribe to a Bayesian epistemology, and in practical terms this amounts to something like being a rational humanist and skeptic. I believe there is an objective world and science can get… Continue reading Critical Postmodern Readings, Part 1: Lyotard

art, language, literature

Year of Giant Novels, Part 3: Moby-Dick

I went in to Moby-Dick with very few preconceptions. The only thing I had heard about it was that there is some chapter on cetology, and everyone finds it too tedious to keep reading. I think this is a poor excuse, because it doesn't occur until Chapter 32 and it isn't that long. Since I've… Continue reading Year of Giant Novels, Part 3: Moby-Dick

art, literature

Year of Giant Novels, Part 1: Don Quixote

Back in my youth, I used to love reading giant novels: Infinite Jest, Underworld, Gravity's Rainbow, The Brothers Karamazov, Anna Karenina, Les Misérables, etc. There are still quite a few left on my list that I haven't gotten around to. In the past few years, I've mostly read short novels. I even find myself getting… Continue reading Year of Giant Novels, Part 1: Don Quixote

art, language, literature, philosophy

On Validity in Interpretation

I have two volumes of critical theory, and an excerpt that appears in both of them is a selection from E.D. Hirsch, Jr.'s Validy in Interpretation. I just got the full book, because I'm fascinated by the argument. This is one of those things where I've made a complete reversal of opinion over the course… Continue reading On Validity in Interpretation