Social Media’s Negative Effect on Prose Style


I’ve noticed this strange trend in the prose style of novels, and I’ve wondered why it’s happening. I finally realized that the prevalence of social media is almost certainly the culprit.

I won’t try to write a whole thesis on the history of this type of thing, but I think it’s pretty commonly accepted that social trends can be a big influence on prose style.

Dickens was wordy because of how serialization worked. The modernists produced intentionally difficult and confusing writing to show how difficult and confusing the world was after the world wars.

And so on.

Here’s the old rule that’s been changing:

Show emotions using subtext.

Stating emotions outright is considered a bit of a faux pas for a reason. It’s a special case of the “show, don’t tell” rule.

When I first started working on my fiction, this came up everywhere. There’s a time and place where it’s acceptable to write: “Joe was mad.” But mostly, this is the result of lazy or untrained writing.

One can show so much more nuance with subtext. Why is he mad? How mad is he? How is it affecting his actions and choices?

Not to mention, showing the emotion makes Joe more human and three-dimensional, because there will be complexity and confusion about the answers to all the questions. It can also turn a passive statement of fact into action.

Joe threw the book across the room at Susie’s head.

The reader can interpret their own emotions into this. Most of the time when I see this rule violated, it’s because the writer doesn’t trust the reader. It shows up in addition to the action:

Susie plopped down next to Robert and placed her hand on his leg. She wanted to upset Joe by flirting with someone else. She locked eyes with Joe and gave him a seductive smile. Joe threw the book across the room at Susie’s head, because he was mad.

Yeah. All that telling can be read into the scene given the context of the rest of the novel or story. Here’s what it sounds like removed:

Susie plopped down next to Robert and placed her hand on his leg. She locked eyes with Joe and gave him a seductive smile. Joe threw the book across the room at Susie’s head.

In real life, I’d try to flesh it out a bit more, but you see the point. Now, I obviously can’t prove that social media has caused this shift, but it makes perfect sense. As a culture, we’re inundated with people’s status updates.

Most of the stories we read are people blatantly telling us their emotions with no subtext. I did a search for the word “mad” on Twitter. Here’s the most recent one:

This is pretty typical. Social media posts tend to be a raw, unfiltered dump of how someone feels. Most social media posts are accompanied by a picture or video. This does the hard work of apt description for the writer.

I don’t want to come off as saying this is “bad.” Social media posts are a completely different medium and serve a different purpose than long-form writing. It’s okay to have different conventions.

What I am saying is that these conventions have started to bleed into longer writing merely because it is what we’re used to now. Very few people read blogs or books or magazines or newspapers these days.

Almost all reading is now done from social media posts.

I have no statistics to back up such a claim, but leisure reading is at an all-time low and the average American spends over 2 hours a day on social media. So I’d say it’s likely true.

I know what you’re thinking: 99% of everything is crap. I shouldn’t jump to conclusions about trends in case I’m reading a string of crap that no one thinks of as good. Well, the inspiration for this post came from reviewer trends.

Many prominent reviewers in the genres I follow have written that certain books have “good writing” when these blatant “mistakes” are all over the book. It got me wondering why reviewers have been desensitized to the emotion dump and have even come to think of it as good writing.

Unfortunately, I blame social media.

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2 thoughts on “Social Media’s Negative Effect on Prose Style

  1. The convention that dumping emotion is bad is just that, a convention. Different times have different conventions. Romantics dumped emotion all over the place, and it’s acceptable to consider romantic writers as good. Besides, dumping emotion might have a good effect on the English language: increasing the number of words and expressions for emotion that most people are familiar with. Currently English is sadly lacking in that regard, compared to Spanish, for example.

    The only thing that really counts as bad writing is writing that the expected reader doesn’t know how to interpret. Anything else is a matter of taste.

  2. I’m not sure romantics wrote in the way I’m describing. Sure, they valued free expression and the feeling of the artist, but they still used subtlety and subtext. Many people find the Bronte sisters difficult today, because so many important pieces of information are buried in small actions.

    The only work that sticks out to me as doing that is Sorrows of Young Werther. But that shouldn’t really count, since it’s a series of letters.

    I also think we can say more about bad writing than that. The “rules” essentially come from collective knowledge of thousands of pieces of writing that haven’t worked. They tend to have a bunch of things in common.

    Sure, you can break every rule and still produce something amazing, but that’s rare. If it’s all taste, I’m not sure there’s even a reason to spend time editing the first rough draft. Editing won’t make the writing “better” in any sense according to that view. It will only bring it more in line with my taste.

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