Thoughts on ToME’s Adventure Mode


I’ve done several posts explaining why I think roguelikes are a great genre of game to play. It is probable that the most important feature of a roguelike for me is permadeath. For example, see this post for reasons why.

If you aren’t up on roguelikes, there are only a handful of games that standout as the “giants” that most people have heard of. One of these is called ToME (aka ToME 4; aka Tales of Maj’Eyal). There are more interesting features in ToME than could fit in a single blog post. Someday I may come back and post about these.

I’ll fully admit that my views on permadeath have evolved a bit, possibly due to my age. I think the older someone gets, the more likely they are to view losing all progress in a game as too punishing to be worth it. You tend to grow out liking the more extreme and hardcore elements of certain games.

Anyway, I stand by my original post. I’ll recall some key points. Permadeath is a great game mechanic, because it forces you to contemplate the consequences of your actions. It gives weight to the game. It makes you become better at it in order to win. You can’t just “save scum” until you get through a particularly difficult section.

Before you take this the wrong way, ToME is possibly the most well-balanced roguelike I’ve played. Every death feels like my own fault and not me getting screwed by the randomness. But when a game involves as much randomness as any of the great classic roguelikes, you are bound to get the occassional unavoidable death that is not your fault.

This becomes more and more pronounced as a game’s design is less thoroughly vetted for imbalances. Part of ToME’s excellent balance comes from people who have put in thousands of hours of play who can spot these things. The developer takes their opinions seriously which makes the game more fair.

ToME has three modes of play: roguelike, adventure, and explore. Roguelike has traditional permadeath. Once your die, you must start the entire game over. Adventure gives you five lives. Once those five are gone, you start the game over. Explore is deathless.

The main point I’ve been contemplating is whether Adventure mode ruins the permadeath experience of a roguelike. This will be a highly controversial statement, but I think it keeps all the original greatness of the mechanic and eliminates the negative aspects.

If you only have five lives, then each one is still precious. You’ll play the early game as if you only have one life, because if you waste one early, you will probably restart anyway. This makes the beginning just as intense as if you only had one life.

Let’s put it this way. If you don’t play as if you only have one life, then you will probably quickly lose them all anyway and revert to roguelike mode. So nothing really changes. In the middle and late game, if you are really good and don’t lose any lives, then it didn’t matter anyway. If you’re like me, you’ll probably be back to one life by that point and get all the benefits of roguelike mode.

It seems to me that Adventure mode merely serves to alleviate the annoyance and waste of time that comes from getting killed in one hit by some out of depth enemy that randomly appeared due to no fault of your own. It keeps all the intensity and pressure of permadeath, but gives some much needed buffer for the extreme amount of randomness of roguelikes.

I’d be quite happy to see some other roguelikes incorporate this as an option, but I’d also be totally understanding if they saw it as a compromise on the quality of the play experience.

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